How to make Patterns!!

After a nice thanksgiving break, I’m back to post something entirely new.

This week on blackandwhitesnapshots we take a look at feature not known by many. A feature that helps people not have to draw out the same shape millions of times. A feature that saves lives. Okay, not really, but it is pretty awesome.

Introducing: Patterns!!!

So. Much. Fun. I’m geeking out over this….

Okay there are two routes that I know of to make patterns. One involves using that Adobe Capture app I’ve been talking about so much lately, and one is right through illustrator.

The adobe capture way is pretty straightforward. You can take a picture of litterally anything, whether it’s a drawing you made or your eyeball, and Capture will turn it into a pattern. Then if your logged into an adobe account, it will pop right up in your library within illustrator. Drag and drop the pattern, and copperboom! You’ve got a pattern to use for anything. Pros: you can mess with filters to arrange the picture in a lot of cool different patterns like a kalidoscope pattern or triangle pattern. It’s also easy to do. Cons: less editing freedom.

The secound way is a little more complicated.  First you have to create a shape of some sort. You could do 3 triangles with alternating colors, some cool swirls or something like that. You establish the pattern, and how it looks. Here are a few of the patterns I started:

Cool sunset swirls:

sunsetswirls

Paint swirls:

paintswirls

Basic Blue stars:

stars

 

Allrighty then, now that you’ve establsihed a pattern you can turn it into a pattern swatch. See, a pattern swatch will allow you to create any shape, and then fill it with the pattern you’ve created. So if I want to make a dress with pink, purple, and blue swirls in it, I can just add my pattern as the fill color and wa la, a swirl dress. Look how I did it here, filling a rectangle with the swirl pattern:

rectswirl.png

Cool huh?

You turn your pattern into a swatch by selecting your entire design, then going to the object tab, select pattern, and press make. You should get a screen something like this:

patternscreen.PNG

Personally the fact that the pattern took over my entire screen frightened me, but there is an easy to get past that. Under copies there is an option for how many times you want the pattern repeated. It won’t limit the copies to that, but it will just make it easier to manage while your editing and looking at it. Another way to control your pattern is by looking at the tile type selection. Your tile is the pattern itself, and by using this selection you can arrange the copies of patterns in different ways. The adobe help page explains the different tile types pretty well:

“Choose how to lay out the tiles:

  • Grid. The center of each tile is horizontally and vertically aligned to the center of the adjacent tiles.
  • Brick by row. Tiles are rectangular in shape, and arranged in rows. Centers of tiles in rows are horizontally aligned. Centers of tiles in alternate columns are vertically aligned.
  • Brick by column. Tiles are rectangular in shape, and arranged in columns. Centers of tiles in columns are vertically aligned. Centers of tiles in alternate columns are horizontally aligned.
  • Hex by column. Tiles are hexagonal in shape, and arranged in columns. Centers of tiles in the columns are vertically aligned. Centers of tiles in alternate columns are horizontally aligned.
  • Hex by row. Tiles are hexagonal in shape, and arranged in rows. Centers of tiles in the rows are horizontally aligned. Centers of tiles in alternate rows are vertically aligned.”

If you want the link to this site here it is: The help page

Once your done messing around with the settings you can press done, and the pattern will end up in your pattern swatch. You can access this by selecting the fill button at the top menu. The pattern should end up right there.

capture1.png

Now you have a pattern that you can use to fill any shape! One more thing though, when you open a NEW file, separate from the one you used to work on the pattern, your pattern won’t show in the fill drop down at first. What you need to do is select the fill button, then go down to the swatch library button, which is that first button in the left corner of the drop down menu. Go down to “Other Library…”. Select the adobe illustrator file that has your pattern in it. It can have more than one pattern in the file! Now your patterns should appear in the fill menu.

And we’re done! Hope that helped all your pattern making needs! I think patterns are one of the funnest things you can make, because there is really no limit to what you can do. Images, shapes, and colors can all be used, and it’s great for some fun experimentation.

See you next week!

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DPE 8- Q and A Questions

What grade do you believe you have earned? Why do you believe that?

I believe that I’ve earned a low A to high B. I’ve been really focused and on task, working hard on the different assignments we’ve had, but I keep forgetting to upload some of my completed photos and blogs…which is the actual grade. I am going to try to be better about that, it’s just a lot of bits and pieces to put together in my mind.

Post the image that you are most proud of and then answer these questions:ib-tshirt-design

Why are you proud of this image and more specifically, what did you learn while creating this image?

I’ve already posted this image, but I love it because it shows so much of my growth. This was the piece where I felt like I really mastered the pen tool, and I experimented with a lot of other different tools that I hadn’t worked with before. I learnt how to align things in a way I liked and really make a piece look cohesive. Even though it wasn’t a winner with the IB coordinator, I still really enjoy it.

What has been your biggest challenge in creating imagery this semester?

I think my biggest challenge has been creating images that I was confident about. I really kept self doubting myself while I was making my images and not focusing on the process. When we had a group forum with all the other ideas for the IB t-shirt I kept comparing my designs to the other one’s, which was not good. This was silly of me, especially since the IB coordinator ended up really liking some of the designs I made.

What project(s) have you enjoyed the most? Why?

I’ve enjoyed the Saxon project the most I think because it was the biggest challenge yet. Also, it was fun to do something in color after we’ve been doing so much in black and white. I really needed to splash some  colored pixels on the virtual canvas.

What project(s) have you enjoyed the least? Why?

 I’ve actually been really frustrated with our latest composite image project. I’ve forgotten a bunch of things from Photoshop and it took me awhile to find all the missing files in my brain about how to cut out part of an image and so forth. I was also feeling annoyed at the photoshopiness (that’s an adjective thankyouverymuch) of my image. You know when you can tell that something is very obviously fake and has been photoshopped in? That is  kind of what it looks like:

Week Three

Second Semester is off and running! I keep putting off updating the blog for Digital Art two so I’m going to talk about last week first, which was the first week we were supposed to update our blog.

Last week I worked on notans, which you can find more about here if you are interested. Basically “Notan” is a Japanese term recognizing dark-light as an element of design. It’s all about how positive and negative space interact with each (think of the yin- yang symbol.) First, we started with a simple 3 by 3 black square in Adobe Illustrator and did some basic cutting and flipping. This was my first basic notan:

simple-notan

As you can see, the jist of a notan is to cut a shape from the black square using the divide tool, and then reflecting it across the axis you want it to. It’s relatively simple once you get the hang of it, and looks kind of cool once your all said and done. Next, we moved on to a complex notan, which we used the pen tool on. I don’t know if I’ve mentioned this before, but I seriously struggle with the pen tool. It’s really hard for me to figure out how it works, and I just don’t understand why my line will go one way when my mouse is moving the other. However, this last week, I was able to start to control it better. It’s not perfect, but it’s a lot better than my first attempts at using it. Here is the complex notan:

complex-notan

I’ll admit right now, I got REALLY frustrated with the complex notan. The horrible Adobe pen tool came back to haunt me from when we first started Adobe Illustrator, and I was not ready. Then I had to figure out why somethings wouldn’t reflect right, and why some would reflect vertical while others would go horizontal. This notan got on my nerves. I’m not even sure if it can be classified as a notan since it’s not exactly symmetrical. In the End though after everything was finished, it looked kind of cool. I tried to make it like a pair of alligator jaws in a river (hence the weird squiggly line and bubbles). I don’t really know why I chose to do a pair of alligator jaws, but it might have been because I was mad at Adobe Illustrator.

Finally, The Original Notan! I left this one incredibly simple because I noticed in my previous one that they got pretty crazy and all over the place. I wanted the notan to be sharp and clear and organized because the was part of the point. I started thinking about the division in groups that we often have. How we think about the labels on them rather than the whole person, and that causes separations or lines between us. Notice how the “labels” are the only thing crazy and out of place in the notan. Yet there is a common unity because we are all sitting around the same “table”.  In addition, if you look at the whole design, it creates one person, not four dot people.

originalnotan1

I think I’m getting a lot better at creating organized designs. When I first started my digital arts class, I didn’t know how to reflect or rotate or align, and so I had a lot of design problems. Look at my last notan, I can see that I’ve grown a lot in that area. My short term goal for digital arts will be improving on my pen tool skills. It’s still pretty hard for me, and I don’t quite get the whole thing about “anchor points” and “handles”. Looking at my notan designs, I can see that I still didn’t have quite the control that I wanted with it. I also would like to figure out how to edit my pen lines. My long term goal for this semester will be paying more attention to detail. I’ve noticed that I’ve been getting frustrated with a peice and eventually think “good enough” even if I don’t really like it. This semester I want to work on having patience with my designs.

 

Week 17 in Review

This week I had a lot of fun- we got to make stickers! It was fun to doodle different symbols and see what I could come up with. I can’t wait to see them come from the vinyl cutter.  Here are some of the stickers that I created this week:

sneakerstickerimage

A Run Fast sticker which I personally didn’t think turned out very well. I didn’t realize until I had exported it that putting the words Run Fast under a shoe might not be the symbolism I was hoping for. Also, the very clean font next to my doodle is just begging for my drawing to be cleaned up-this one didn’t go the vinyl cutter. However, in my next sticker I addressed the tidiness problem. My model for the shoe was a clip art picture from this link.

flowersticker

A Grow sticker! This one was definitely my favorite- my drawing looks much cleaner and compliments  the Joker man font from Adobe Illustrator.

runfaststicker.jpg

This is another Run Fast sticker but with a snail instead. I started thinking about an oxymoron during the tutorial here which said that a field mouse wouldn’t be a very good doodle to have under the word BOLD, unless you were trying to be funny or get the viewer thinking. Compared to most people in the cross country world I’m a snail, and yet I tell myself to run fast at every race- so I thought this sticker might be a good reminder to myself sometimes.

I think that I have accomplished both of my goals from the past few weeks. I’ve gotten better at saying more with less, and I am getting the vector image thing down.

We also did a T shirt design this week which turned out really cool. Mine says “Organic” which was printed against a black plain t shirt. (Scroll down for my final design for some reason my organic symbol took up an unreasonable amount of space)

 

organictshirt

Final Projectimnotkidding.jpg

Finally, here is my FINAL PROJECT for digital arts 1. I’m so sad I am not going to have this class next semester because it was truly one of the best electives I’ve ever taken. I tried to keep my drawing simple because I have so much trouble getting Adobe Capture to work right, and I knew I was going to struggle it. I hope to continue working with Digital Media on my own because I find it so fun and new. It seems as if there are always new things you can do to manipulate your drawings and pictures. I think that I might end up continuing to edit this blog, mostly with my photography. I’ve grown a lot over this semester, from becoming impatient with the smallest design problem to being able to put together vector images in minutes. I still have work to do,  and my final images are certainly not as good as some others, but I’ve learned to be patient and have discovered new mediums that I’ve never dreamed of.